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Privacy is a three-way relationship … or is it four+? 30 May 2014

Posted by Tony Law in Impact of IT, ITasITis, Social issues, Social media, Tech Watch, Technorati.
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I’ve been reading, and I recommend, Eben Moglen’s two-part essay in The Guardian about Edward Snowden. Not the first comment but probably one of the most extensive and authoritative. Moglen is professor of law and legal history at Columbia University, and is the founder and leader of the Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC). He’s entitled to say “I told you so” since his Guardian bio lists an earlier article for the paper some three years ago. The SFLC itself is approaching its tenth birthday; it was founded by Moglen and others in February 2005.

This extended essay covers three full pages in each of two days’ papers so it’s not short reading. The consensus among those who broadly support Snowden’s action is that he has revealed a security industry operating beyond democratic control and subverting the very nature of democratic government. It exposes a supposed elite group who believe that the population at large is, or shelters, “the enemy” (terrorists is the current hate-word) and therefore, in a world where universal surveillance and analysis is possible, such surveillance is to be fully deployed. It’s a bit like The Section in Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy, but at a much higher level and operating with the full power of the subverted state.

And it’s not just the American NSA, though that’s Snowden’s origin. It’s not even just the major western allies of the US. China takes the same attitude: and though politically on the opposite side to the US, on this issue it lines up behind the same attitudes.

Moglen makes a powerful point which ought to be obvious but isn’t. Privacy is not a two-way relationship (between me and Facebook, or me and Gmail, or me and Twitter, or whoever).

If I send or receive email via Google (as an example only, but they are probably the biggest) then the person to whom I send, or from whom I receive mail also falls within Google’s all-encompassing range. They have not signed an agreement with Google, but Google knows about them. Facebook knows who I post to, whose postings I read, which non-friends I look up from time to time. Twitter knows … and so on. What does WordPress know about this blog and you, my readers?

Which is ok so far as these and other providers are trustable. But Snowden avers that, with or without their consent, they are not.

There is much more analysis in the article, but let’s stick just to this one point. The privacy relationship inherent in email is at least three way: myself, my service provider and my correspondent. But there is no relationship of explicit trust or consent between my correspondent and my provider.

Moglen asserts that we have been diverted into believing that privacy is a two way relationship. It’s not.

And of course where governments step in, either by court order or by extra-legal surveillance, this relationship becomes at least four way with the fourth partner, in all probability, unrecognised and unknown.

As a lawyer, Moglen analyses two broad threads to bring the situation under control.

First: user action. This does include community development of encryption software, for example, to which governments have not either sub-poena’d or stolen the keys, or built-in back doors. But it also include major commercial interests: the security (privacy) of their online commercial transactions is a fig-leaf. They must have people who realise this; it’s been pointed out often enough in the press. But it will probably take a disaster to galvanise enough pressure to force action.

Second: legal action. The US, in particular, is prone to expensive litigation and extensive damages settlements. Let’s open up one or two of these based on breach of trust. I hope I’m not misrepresenting Moglen’s argument here, but certainly he – as a lawyer – sees scope for lawyerly involvement.

I’ve scratched the surface. If these are issues that concern you, read Moglen’s essay in the Guardian online. Then go, as I myself have not yet done, to Moglen’s own SFLC archive where the longer version is held: four presentations given last autumn at Columbia and given their own URL. Read and think and, if you’re in a position to do so, act.

And yes, this blog post will be flagged on both Facebook and Twitter …

Links:
• Privacy under attack: the NSA files revealed new threats to democracy, Guardian, 27 May 2014
• Eben Moglen: Guardian contributor bio, with links to the 2011 article<
• Snowden and the Future, Eben Moglen, Columbia, Oct-Dec 2013
• Software Freedom Law Center
• Stieg Larsson’s Millennium trilogy (Wikipedia)

Technology in concert 6 May 2014

Posted by Tony Law in Impact of IT, ITasITis, Tech Watch, Technorati.
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Two posts in one day … This one very brief.

We had the great pleasure, a couple of days ago, of hearing the great Canadian pianist Angela Hewitt perform in Glyndebourne as part of the Brighton Festival. J S Bach’s Art of Fugue appeals to the geek: it is strongly rooted in the systematic mathematical patterns of music, at which Bach excelled. Hewitt started with a short talk, and added enormously to our enjoyment of the music which she then settled to play, continuously, for almost two hours. A tour de force indeed.

OK, I get to do a very brief music review which isn’t a chance I get often. But like today’s other post (the Lego one), there’s a double link from something at first sight very non-IT into the world of technology.

Not just the structure of the music. But on the music stand of the piano I could clearly see an iPad or something quite like it. Printed music has been the same for around seven centuries, and has considerable advantages. Performers scribble on their scores to assist with performance, whether it’s members of an amateur choir such as the one we sing in, or high-end professional soloists who normally commit their music to memory before going on stage. But it has a big disadvantage in performance: someone has to turn the pages and this normally means an amanuensis sitting alongside in the concert hall.

I’ve wondered occasionally whether there exists performer’s software which could display music to play from, and turn pages automatically. Well, now I know. There is. It was just waiting for decent tablet computers to come along, which could be placed on the music stand instead of a paper copy.

And Angela Hewitt uses it. Why am I sure? Because I found a reference to it, with a picture, in a review of a concert she gave in Australia six months ago.

Only one development still needed. The performer needs a pedal to move the pages on. How about sound recognition so it would know when to move on without intervention? Though it would be difficult to handle repeats and so on.

Links:
• Angela Hewitt
• Canadian pianist Angela Hewitt performs at Glyndebourne as part of Brighton Festival, Duncan Hall, Brighton Argus, 2 May 2014 (prior to performance, not a review)
• Angela Hewitt: Masterly performance in Melbourne, Musica Viva Australa, 25 Sep 2013
• forScore music reader for iPad (no doubt other software is available.This is the first one I found, and most search results are for creating music, not for playing from)

 

Lego as social media 6 May 2014

Posted by Tony Law in Cloud, Impact of IT, ITasITis, Social issues, Social media, Tech Watch.
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Yes you did read that correctly.

I caught up, a day or two ago, on a programme put out on the BBC Culture Show on 4th March about Lego.

The programme comments on the characteristics of Lego. It charts its evolution from a very simple kit of highly standard basic blocks. Today’s typical box contains the parts for a specific model, which are no way generic: many of the individual parts are of use for that model and that one only.

But what caught my attention towards the end of the programme was the description of how Lego has been used to enable communities to contribute to their own architectural evolution.

Bjarke Ingels, a contemporary leading architect, has used Lego to design architecture from a standard kit of parts: but far more imaginatively than the square tower blocks of the 1960s.

More striking still was Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson whose Collectivity project took three tonnes of Lego to the citizens of Tirana, Albania in 2005. The bricks were just dumped in a heap in the town square and, within a short time, groups of people were creating, building, and re-imagining their city. The Lego acted as a medium through which they could express their ideas – not individually, but together. Not mentioned in the programme is that this is one of a range of similar projects; I’ve found others in Oslo (2011) and Copenhagen (2008).

At the end of the programme, there’s a move into actual social media and a look at Minecraft which, if you haven’t heard of it (I hadn’t!) is a cult computer game. Minecraft may be set to transform the cities of the future: like Tirana’s Lego, but in the virtual online world. It’s worth a look at the video on Minecraft’s home page. As Minecraft’s website says: “At first, people built structures to protect against nocturnal monsters, but as the game grew players worked together to create wonderful, imaginative things”.

Isn’t that what our social media, at their best, aim to do? Not for people to create individually, for their own gratification, but to share and create together. And like early Lego, the best social platforms are the ones which offer a simple kit of parts from which sophisticated collaborative spaces can be created.

Links:
• Lego – The Building Blocks of Architecture: BBC, 4 Mar 2014. The programme itself is not available here; this is just a short outline. It is available on YouTube: I don’t know if this is a legit copy!
• Lego Towers project from the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), which showcases many projects on its website. Ingels comes into the programme about 15 minutes in.
• Collectivity Project from Olafur Eliasson. The Tirana project is covered in the programme from about 19 minutes.
The Collectivity Project (Olafur Eliasson), OpenIDEO (contribution by Anne Kjaer Riechert), 17 Nov 2011.
• Olafur Eliasson’s LEGO for public tower building 2008
, YouTube, 13 Oct 2008 (Copenhagen: linked from a comment to the OpenIDEO posting)
• Minecraft

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